Items to Avoid

Alcoholic beverages

Baby Food



Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources

Cat food

Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine


Citrus oil extracts

Fat trimmings

Grapes and raisins



Hops


Human vitamin supplements containing iron


Large amounts of liver


Macadamia nuts


Marijuana


Milk and other dairy products




Moldy or spoiled food, garbage


Mushrooms


Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder)



Persimmons

Pits from peaches and plums

Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems

Raw fish



Salt


String


Sugary foods


Table scraps (in large amounts)



Tobacco



Yeast dough
        Reasons to Avoid Them

Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system


Generally too high in protein and fats.

Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems.

Can cause vomiting.

Can cause pancreatitis.

Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys. There have been no problems associated with grape seed extract.

Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.
Pets, especially puppies and kittens, tend to explore their world by putting everything in their mouth. This may help them learn about their environment, but it can also be harmful. Many plants are dangerous. Some may cause vomiting or diarrhea while others may cause organ failure and death. Pet owners should seriously take the responsibility of keeping pets away from dangerous plants.

Below, we have provided a list of some of the more common poisonous plants. This is not an all-inclusive list. The same plant may also have different common names depending on the area of the country in which one resides. Every pet owner should know what plants are in and around his/her house.

If you think your pet has chewed on or eaten one of these plants, please contact your veterinarian, animal emergency clinic, or the poison control center for advice. The ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center hotline numbers are as follows:

    *

      1-900-443-0000 ($55.00 per case). The charge is billed directly to the caller's phone.
    *

      1-888-4ANI-HELP or 1-888-426-4435 ($55.00 per case). The charge is billed to caller's credit card only.

A-B

Aloe Vera
Amaryllis
Apple (seeds)
Apricot (pit)
Arrowhead
Asparagus Fern
Avocado
Autumn Crocus
Azalea

Baneberry
Begonia
Bird of Paradise
Black Locust
Black Walnut
Bleeding Heart
Boston Ivy

C

Caladium
California Poppy
Calla Lily
Carnation
Castor Bean
Ceriman
Cherry (seeds, wilting leaves, and pit)
Chinese Evergreen
Chives
Christmas Rose
Chrysanthemum
Clematis
Corn Plant
Crocus
Croton
Crown of Thorns
Crown Vetch
Cyclamen

D-F

Daffodil
Delphinium
Devil's Ivy
Dicentra
Dieffenbachia
Donkey Tail
Dumb Cane
Dutchman's Breeches

Easter Lily
Elderberry
Elephant Ears
English Ivy
Eucalyptus

Fiddle-leaf Fig
Florida Beauty
Four O'Clock
Foxglove
Foxtail
Fruit Salad Plant

G-I

German Ivy
Gladiola

Hemlock
Holly
Honeysuckle
Hurricane Plant
Hyacinth
Hydrangea

Iris
Ivy

J-L

Jack in the Pulpit
Japanese Yew
Jerusalem Cherry
Jimson Weed
Jonquil

Kalanchoe

Lamb's quarter
Lantana
Larkspur
Laurel
Lily
Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Locoweed
Lords-and-Ladies
Lupine

M-N

Marigold (Marsh Marigold)
Marijuana
Mayapple
Mexican Breadfruit
Milkweed
Mistletoe
Monkshood
Morning Glory
Mother-in-Law plant
Mother-in-Law's Tongue
Mountain Laurel
Mushrooms

Narcissus
Nephthytis
Nightshade

O-P

Oak Tree (buds and acorns)
Oleander
Onion

Peace Lily
Peach (wilting leaves and pits)
Pencil Tree
Philodendron
Pigweed
Poinsettia
Poison Ivy
Poison Hemlock
Poison Oak
Poison Sumac
Poppy
Potato (all green parts)
Pothos
Precatory Bean

Q-S

Rhododendron
Rhubarb
Ribbon Cactus
Rubber Tree

Sago Palm
Schefflera
Shamrock Plant
Snake Plant
Snow on the Mountain
Sorghum
Star of Bethlehem
Stinging Nettle
Stinkweed
Swiss Cheese Plant

T-V

Taro Vine
Toadstools
Tobacco
Tomato Plant (entire plant except ripe fruit)

Umbrella Tree

W-Z

Water Hemlock
Weeping Fig
Wisteria

Yew

For more information please visit http://www.peteducation.com/ or speak to your vet.
AntiFreeze
The active ingredient in antifreeze is Ethylene Glycol (EG), a fatal toxin. Most animals contact the poison due to the ways in which antifreeze is discarded. Animals, attracted by the sweet taste, may drink it directly, or become indirectly poisoned as they wash their soiled paws and fur. As little as two ounces can kill a dog and one teaspoon will kill a cat.
The signs of EG poisoning include excessive thirst and urination, lack of coordination, weakness, nausea, tremors, vomiting, rapid breathing and heart rate, convulsions, diarrhea, and paralysis.
Once EG is inside the body, it is changed into a crystalline acid which attacks the kidneys. Treatment involves intravenous alcohol to prevent EG from being converted to oxalic acid that damages the kidneys.
Pets rarely survive EG poisoning, because symptoms can be subtle and most pet owners don't recognize their pets are seriously ill until it is too late. If you suspect your pet may have ingested antifreeze, TAKE YOUR PET TO YOUR VETERINARIAN IMMEDIATELY. Death ensues within hours. Immediate treatment is essential to prevent a painful death.


Reducing the Risk
T
o avoid the risk of poisoning animals a few basic safety measures are required:
When changing antifreeze keep your pets indoors.
Avoid spilling antifreeze on the ground and don't drain radiators into ditches or storm drains.
Keep the new antifreeze in its original container.
To store used antifreeze before disposal, put it into a clearly labelled, sealed container. Recycle or dispose of it at a garage with appropriate facilities for disposing of antifreeze.
Keep antifreeze off the floor and away from pets.
Wipe up and wash away any spills.
If your pet returns home covered with an unknown substance, wash it off immediately.
Winter auto window washing fluids and products to prevent freezing in plumbing can also contain ethylene glycol. Check the ingredients, and if it contains EG, treat it the same as antifreeze.
There is a safe alternative - switch to non-toxic Propylene Glycol formulated antifreeze.